Adding an Existing User or Editor to a Non-Default App

Adding a User or Editor to a Non-Default App

You may have more than one app in your app library. Most of our clients will have at least one ‘default’ app, visible to everyone in the organisation. Some will also have apps that are only visible to specifically assigned users – for example, an app for a specific event or location within your business. Non-default apps are those without ‘can be accessed by all users in your organisation‘ ticked in the app settings:

 

 

 

To manually add a single user to this kind of app, click on the cog icon at the top of the CMS and search for the user you wish to add.

Note: If you’re adding multiple users at once to a non-default channel, it’s easier to follow the guide for bulk adding here.

Once in the user’s CMS profile, go to the channels tab, and click on + add new channel and you see a list of all available channels:

 

 

Choose ‘User’ or ‘Editor’ in the user drop-down menu, depending on what access you wish to grant.

If you choose ‘Editor’, this user will be able to log in to the CMS and add content to this channel.

Once you have selected the user role, click on ‘Save Changes’.

Editing a User’s Profile & Changing a User’s Password

Editing a User’s Profile & Changing a User’s Password

 

To edit a user’s profile, click on the cog icon in the CMS menu bar, and you will again be presented with the list of users in your organisation. To edit someone’s profile, search for them, click on their username, then click on ‘reset password’:

 

Here, you can edit any of the information you require, or you can click on ‘reset password‘ to give the user a new password.

 

When changing a user’s password, it must comply with the following password rules:

  • At least eight characters long
  • Contain an uppercase letter
  • Contain a lowercase letter
  • Contain a number
  • Contain a special character (such as ! ? &)

When you have selected a new password, click on ‘Reset’ to change the password.

 

Setting up Google Analytics

To add Google Analytics tracking to your app, you will first of all need to create an account at https://analytics.google.com

Inside Google Analytics, you will need to create a ‘Property’ for your app. To do so, click on ‘Admin’ at the bottom left of the screen:

 

 

 

 

Now look at the middle column of the next screen, and select the drop-down menu, then ‘Create New Property’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the next screen, you are asked to choose if you want to track a Website or a Mobile App. Please choose ‘website’, then complete the rest of the fields. Where it asks you to enter the website URL, you can simply enter the URL of your business’ website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you have completed all of the fields, click on ‘Get Tracking ID’ to get your Google Analytics Tracking code.

Now copy the tracking code, and navigate to the CMS, and to your required app in the app library, then click on ‘Settings’:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now navigate to the ‘Analytics’ tab and copy your Google Analytics Tracking ID in to the field:

 

 

 

 

 

And finally, click ‘Save and Publish’ to save your code. You will now be able to log in to Google Analytics to see usage statistics for your app, from the date that you saved the Tracking ID in TheAppBuilder CMS.

How many people are using my app?

While you can use the app store and the Google Play Console to tell how many people have downloaded your app, Google Analytics gives you a much clearer picture of how many users are actually accessing it and reading your content.

In Google Analytics Audience Overview screen, you’ll be able to tell how many people have accessed the app over a given date range, how often each person is using it on average, and how long they are spending in the app.

In Google Analytics, click on Audience > Overview, and you’ll get the following report:

 

 

Note: Don’t forget to set the date range at the top right!

Lets go through each part of the report.

Graph

 

The graph provides a visual representation of access to the app over the selected date range. If you see a particular spike in the graph – a day or week when a higher than average number of people used the app – ask yourself why. Was there a particularly popular piece of content, or was a new feature added? If you see a spike, think about how to capitalise on that information!

The graph above is fairly typical for an employee app – you can clearly see much lower levels of use at the weekends!

 

Users & Sessions

The users number tells you the amount of individual users who have accessed your app during the selected date range. This includes the mobile app and the desktop webapp together.

The sessions is telling you – of all of your users, how many times they have accessed the app.

So if we have 308,787 sessions initiated by 26,273 users, that tells us that on average, those users have accessed the app 12 times during the selected date range. Of course, this is just an average – some will have accessed it much more often while others much less.

 

Screens / Session & Average Session Duration

The screens / session figure is telling you the average number of screens visited by a user each time they access the app. In this example, an average user is looking at 4-5 screens on each visit.

While the average session duration shows how long on average your users are spending in the app. An average session duration of 2-3 minutes is fairly average for a staff app. If you have just released your app, expect that your screens / session and average session duration will be high, and will gradually reduce and level out as your users become accustomed to the type of content that’s available in the app.

 

Returning vs New Users

This shows the percentage of returning users vs new users in your app, during the selected date range. In the weeks from your app launch, most of your users will be new users – accessing the app for the first time. Over time, you’ll want to see the overwhelming majority of users as returning users.

If your app has been released for six months, and the majority are new users (and you can see that your average sessions per user is low), it would tell you that people are willing to download and try the app, but aren’t finding anything to keep them coming back. So, you would need to think about your content strategy.

If however, your returning users is high, and you have a high average sessions per user, but lower than expected total user numbers – it might suggest that app marketing is the issue, rather than content – you’ll need to get out there and let people know that your app is available!

 

How loyal are my users?

As you’ve seen, the audience overview screen can show you how many users you’ve had in a specific date range, but it’s also important to understand how loyal your users are – whether they’re actually accessing the app on a regular basis.

For data privacy, you can’t see how many times an individual user has logged in using Google Analytics, but you can report on user loyalty across your entire user base.

There are two places in Google Analytics that give you a guide to your user loyalty. The ‘Loyalty’ report and the cohort analysis.

Loyalty Report

In Google Analytics, go to Audience > Behaviour > Loyalty

 

This runs a report showing how often your users, on average, accessed the app during the selected date range.

Note: remember to adjust the date range at the top-right of the screen.

 

In the example above, we can see that 12,280 of the sessions in the app were had by people who only accessed the app for the first time during the time period selected. (In this example, we’re showing a three-month period). While 98,684 sessions were had by users who had visited more than 200 times previously.

During the weeks and months from your app launch, you’ll expect to see this graph as ‘top-heavy’ – in that all of your users will only have a small amount of sessions. As time goes on however, you’ll want to see this report trend towards the example above, where the majority of sessions are being initiated by users who are opening the app time and time again.

If you’re struggling to retain user loyalty, think about what content within your app is useful for your users, or what you might add to make the app a more desirable destination for your staff.

 

Cohort Analysis

The Cohort Analysis is concerned with showing the retention rate of users logging in for the first time. If you know that you’re rolling your app out to a particular site during a specific week, then the cohort analysis tracks the users who started using the app during that week, and shows how many have re-visited the week after and so on.

In Google Analytics, click on Cohort Analysis

 

Now select the cohort size. In the example below, we have selected ‘week’, to track all users who started using the app in a specific week. Also choose how many weeks you want to show. In this example, we’re tracking the users for six weeks, but you can select up to twelve weeks.

 

Each row is a cohort of users. So the first row represents the users who used the app for the first time during the week commencing 22nd July. Week 0 is 100% because all of those users accessed the app. Reading from left to right, you can see that of the 1,137 users who used the app for the first time that week, just over half of them used it again the week after, 43% the week after that, and so on. In this example there’s a gradual drop off, so that by the sixth week, 13% of those new users have accessed the app six weeks after using it for the first time.

According to Localytics, the average churn rate for mobile apps is 71% after 90 days.

 

Meaning that on average, just 29% of people will still be using an app after they have downloaded it. Obvious exceptions apply to the big apps like Instagram, Facebook, Twitter.

So now that you know how to track your retention rate, how can you improve it?

Good Content. Is your content vibrant and engaging? Do your users have a way to submit their own content to the app, to interact, or is it all one way?

Useful. Is the app useful for your employees? Make sure to add content or include sections of the app with content that is useful, rather than simply informational. Your app can act as a central hub to signpost to other third party systems that your organisation makes use of. You might want to consider implementing our native peer to peer recognition feature also, to allow your staff to say thanks to others for a job well done.

Social. Have you enabled your app’s social features? Allowing your users to like and comment on your content, and discuss via comment-replies is a great way to increase app engagement and help to retain users.

Notifications. Are you making good use of push notifications? After publishing a post in TheAppBuilder CMS, you’ll see the option to send a push notification. Notifications are a great way to drive traffic to your app, and let users know about new content that has been added.

Personalisation. Especially in larger organisations, people don’t want information overload. Consider creating user groups, and setting the audience for your content so that it appears only for those to whom it’s relevant. Users are much more likely to keep coming back if they feel that their app experience is tailored to them.

What content is most popular? (mobile)

This guide will show you how to run a custom report to let you know exactly how many views each piece of your content has had on mobile, in any given time period.

In your Google Analytics account, click on ‘Customisation’, then on the ‘New Custom Report’ button:

 

In the next screen, you’re going to choose a metric and a dimension for the report. Click on the blue ‘add metric’ button and search for ‘screen views’ – click on screen views when you see it appear in the drop-down:

 

 

Now click on the green ‘add dimension’ button and search for ‘screen name’ and click on it when it appears in the drop-down:

 

 

Now click ‘Save’ and your report will be displayed. The first thing you’ll want to do is select your date range at the top-right of the screen. You’ll see a graph, and below it, you’ll see each of the screens in your app, with the number of screen views for each piece of content. Remember, it’s only showing the screen views for the selected date range.

If you want to find out how many views a specific screen has got, simply search for it in the search bar.

 

 

At the top of the screen views column, you’ll see a total amount of screen views for the date range selected. However, if you want the true total, you’ll need to add this to the total amount of page views for the desktop version of your app, as they are counted separately in Google Analytics.

To see how to run a similar report for seeing desktop page views, click here.

What content is most popular? (desktop)

This guide will show you how to run a custom report to let you know exactly how many views each piece of your content has had on desktop, in any given time period.

In your Google Analytics account, click on ‘Customisation’, then on the ‘New Custom Report’ button:

 

In the next screen, you’re going to choose a metric and a dimension for the report. Click on the blue ‘add metric’ button and search for ‘page views’ – click on screen views when you see it appear in the drop-down:

 

 

Now click on the green ‘add dimension’ button and search for ‘page title’ and click on it when it appears in the drop-down:

 

 

Now click ‘Save’ and your report will be displayed. The first thing you’ll want to do is select your date range at the top-right of the screen. You’ll see a graph, and below it, you’ll see each of the pages in your app, with the number of page views for each piece of content. Remember, it’s only showing the page views for the selected date range.

If you want to find out how many views a specific page has got, simply search for it in the search bar.

 

 

At the top of the screen views column, you’ll see a total amount of screen views for the date range selected. However, if you want the true total, you’ll need to add this to the total amount of page views for the desktop version of your app, as they are counted separately in Google Analytics.

To see how to run a similar report for seeing mobile app screen views, click here.

Reporting on Social Engagement in your app

With the ability for your users to like and comment on your content, and to converse via comment-replies, it’s important to be able to report on the level of interaction going on in your app.

This guide shows how to run a report in Google Analytics to show you the number of likes and comments in your app for any given date range.

Please Note: The ability to report on social interaction in the app was introduced with version 18.9.0 – you can check which version of the app you are on by looking at the number on the login screen. Social interaction will only be tracked from the date that your app was updated to 18.9.0. If your app is pre-18.9.0 and you wish to request an update, please get in touch with our support team.

 

In Google Analytics, social interactions are called ‘Events’, so start by clicking on ‘Behaviour’ in the left hand menu, then ‘Events’ and ‘Top Events’

 

This runs a report showing you the total number of social interactions in your app (for the date-range specified) and is split in to three categories:

  • Likes
  • Comments
  • Liked-Comments

 

This report shows you the total number of interactions, and break-down of how many there have been of each type. The metric to look at on this report is simply ‘Total Events’ for each type.

To drill-down further, you’ll need to click on the type of event. For example, let’s click on ‘Like’ to get more details about what our users have been liking in the app:

 

This gives you a breakdown of the likes in the app, for each screen / page, ordered by the most-liked (or most-commented if you clicked on ‘Comment’), allowing you to see exactly which screens your users are liking and commenting on.

You can also search for a specific screen using the search bar.

 

Along with the report to find out which content is viewed most often, you can use this information to refine your content strategy. Are you seeing something that users are interacting with more than usual? Then do more of that if you want to increase the engagement and interaction in the app.

 

 

 

Allow your content to be shared to social media

External content sharing is a good way to organically increase your social media presence. There may be some content that you publish in your app, that you’d like your users to be able to share outside the app also – with their social media friends. For example, a job posting or news about a charity fundraiser in your business. Anything that you wouldn’t mind people outside of your organisation reading.

Allowing your users to share content is simple. On a page in the CMS, simply tick the ‘Allow external sharing’ option on the right hand menu:

 

This will add a share icon to the screen, which when tapped, allows your users to share the page to other apps they have installed on their phone, such as Facebook, Linkedin, SMS, Whatsapp, etc.

When the page is shared, when opened it will display as a single webpage, hosted by TheAppBuilder. So those outside of your organisation will not be able to see any of your other app content, nor will they be able to see any likes or comments on that page that exist in your app.

 

 

Image Guidelines

Images can either be added within modular pages, or as ‘Featured Images’ to go along with a content item, to be displayed within a list alongside the title of the item.

An image on a modular page:

A Featured Image within a list:

 

Guidelines – Images within pages

Any images you upload to a modular page will display exactly ‘as-is’ without any cropping. You therefore don’t really need to worry about about the aspect ratio of these images too much, as anything goes!

Please consider the size of your images before uploading. Remember that your users may be using their own data connection to view your content. They’re going to have a smoother experience and it will be lighter on their data allowance if you choose images that can maintain quality in a lower file size. Try to keep your images below 1MB in size.

Guidelines – Featured images

When you set a featured image for a content item or list, that image will get cropped to an approximate 4:3 aspect ratio.

Examples of a 4:3 aspect ratio:

800x600px
960x720px
1400x1050px
1440x1080px

As we don’t currently have a cropping tool within the CMS, you’ll need to crop your featured image as appropriate, before uploading it.

For example, if we were to try setting this 300x148px image as a featured image for a page:

 

 

Then it’s going to be cropped to a 4:3 ratio, and we’ll lose some of the text. It would look like this:

 

 

However, were we to crop the image to a 4:3 aspect ratio by adding some whitespace around it:

 

 

Now that’s it’s close to a 4:3 aspect ratio, it’s not going to get cropped:

 

 

The same goes for an image that you can’t add whitespace to. If you have a wide image to use for a featured image, then crop it to 4:3 ratio before uploading it, so that you can choose which part of the image is featured: